Training Center

APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING


The electrical training ALLIANCE's goal is to provide the Electrical Construction Industry with the most highly trained and skilled workforce possible. While direct training occurs through local training programs, the electrical training ALLIANCE develops enhanced education standards to meet the competitive challenges of today's global market economy. 
In addition to receiving skill training on the job, each apprentice is provided with trade-related classroom training that produces competency and pride that lead to true craftsmanship. Quite often, local training committees provide special classes with hands-on training to support classroom lectures and discussions.

WHAT DO ELECTRICAL WORKERS DO?
There are four specialty areas where you will find electrical workers. 
  • Outside Linemen- install the distribution and transmission lines that move power from the plant to a factory, a business, or home. 
  • Inside Wiremen-install the power, lighting, controls and other electrical equipment in commercial and industrial buildings. 
  • VDV Installer Technicians-install circuits and equipment for telephones, computer networks, video distribution systems, security and access control systems and other low voltage systems. 

INSIDE WIREMAN
While the Outside Lineman works on the distribution network, bringing power from sources of generation to the customers, the Inside Wireman's job is to distribute and connect the customer's electrical equipment to that power source. The Inside Wireman installs and maintains all of the various types of electrical systems found in commercial and industrial facilities. Equipment used may include lighting, receptacles, motors, heating equipment, and systems that control the operation of all of a facility's energy usage.
The Inside Wireman installs conduit systems that contain the wire from the motor control centers or panelboards to all of the equipment that uses electricity. Those conduits may contain power cables or control cables. Many of the conduit systems are exposed and must be installed to exacting standards using neat and workmanlike craftsmanship.
The work of an Inside Wireman can vary. One day the Inside Wireman could be installing a Fire Alarm System or Security System in a high rise building and the next day he or she could be installing conduit in a ditch on the outside of the building. Inside Wiremen also install electrical systems in industrial facilities such as chemical plants, power plants, chip manufacturing facilities and automobile plants. Each type of installation has specific electrical needs and systems to support those needs. While there are many tasks associated with the Inside Wireman classification, the apprenticeship training provides all of the knowledge necessary.


OUTSIDE LINEMAN
IBEW members jointly trained by the IBEW and NECA can be seen constructing transmission lines which bring power from far away generating plants to local service areas.
Apprentices learn to employ safe practices while working under the supervision of a Journey-Level WorkerLineman.
Outside Linemen do not always have the comfort of performing their work from a bucket truck. Linemen must develop climbing skills, as much of their work is atop wooden poles. Linemen often find themselves working in bad weather and storms in order to maintain electrical power for homes, hospital, factories and schools.

*To apply as an outside lineman, go to www.neat1968.org 


INSTALLER TECHNICIAN
While the Inside Wireman is installing the conduit and power feeders on a project, the Installer Technician is working beside the Wireman, installing the network of low voltage cabling that is used for video, voice and data or other low voltage signaling.
While most installations are in buildings that are partially or fully enclosed to protect from sun, wind and rain, these installations oftenoccur before air conditioning, heat or permanent light fixtures have been installed in the buildings. 
Backbone voice and data cables are routed between the entrance facility, where communications signals enter a building, to equipment and telephone rooms. Voice and data horizontal cables are routed between telephone or equipment rooms and individual workstations throughout the building.
Equipment rooms often contain energized equipment such as hubs, file servers or telephone switches. These devices are configured and connected to the communications network that serves the building, and must not be interrupted.
The Installer Technician installs voice and data outlets at workstations. In addition, they install punch down blocks and cross connects in telephone rooms. These may be wall-mounted or rack-mounted, and must be grouped and identified according to specific installation standards. Whether the work is in new construction or in existing office or manufacturing space, the IBEW-NECA craftsperson takes pride in the work he or she has and can performed.
The electrical training ALLIANCE trains to TIA/EIA and other industry standards. The electrical training ALLIANCE also partners with the major manufacturers in the video, voice and data industry to assure training in the latest technologies including training for manufacturers warranted installs.